Tag Archives: Value

Repeal and Replace: “We’re doing THE DEMOCRATS a service.”

Like many of us around the world, I’m watching President elect Trumps press conference. Am I the only one staggering over the idealism in play? Apparently not: this news conference is being held in part over stock market fluctuations related to some of his comments. I’m not ready to speak to what I’m hearing point by point, but I stand by the insight and measured appraisal of my fellow citizens that this man may prove to be the best choice for America and the global economy right now.

It’s an exciting time for me, to be starting a new semester-quarter working toward my paralegal with Trump heading into office. I’ve had and continue to have, personal baggage that is worthy of grief, bitterness and THERAPY. I’m almost confused by the combination of reality and motivation Trump seems to clarify for me, simply by being HIMSELF. I realize that many people around the world find him to be out of sync with his fellow human beings. The degree of his deviations from what many DO CALL idealism, obscures difference about natural philosophy and definitions of idealism generally. Folks, this is THE BIG STUFF…My eyes truly are wide as flying saucers and I’ve not felt so comfortable IN HISTORY as I do now. I’ve been uncomfortable for OVER TEN YEARS. I’m not comfortable now but I’m a bit more comfortable than I’ve been which is an improvement. Wiggle Room! 

I am holding back an opinion for the interim about idealism. Here’s why: For any conscious actor, any individual, seeking to erect universal standards applicable for human beings IN ADDITION TOO oneself, dualism is the most insidious counterpoint. Dualism itself includes double standards by default. At LEAST TWO SETS OF BOOKS: AXIOLOGY.

Since I’m my first and only student, this is MY QUESTION: At what point is AXIOLOGY REFLEXIVE? My question for others, is at what point, does the question two paragraphs above depart FROM “Both-And” and become an equivocation fallacy that creates a separate “peace,” politely speaking?

Ideology is suspected of solipsism around the world logically. Given this, what am I, what are we, how are YOU DEAR READER, categorizing and allocating VALUE?

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2017 and Kon Mari Method

Marie Kondo’s book The life changing magic of tidying up became a best seller not too many years ago. She followed up with a guide book titled Spark Joy: an illustrated master class on the art of organizing and tidying up.

I picked up her guide book last November and I’m slowly putting her method to work for me. The Kon Mari Method as it’s now known is basic, which truly is more delightful than may first be apparent. There are six principles or rules to work within.

Principle 1: Commit yourself to creating change in your habits and manner of living.

Principle 2: Imagine your IDEAL lifestyle. Really devote some time to describing the way you want to live. It may NOT be a bad idea for the introspective to also note how you feel, not only about your distance from your goal, but also IF attaining your ideal living style may change you. Why is this a valuable step? As the author says, “When you imagine your ideal lifestyle, you are actually clarifying WHY YOU WANT TO TIDY and identifying the kind of life you want to live, WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED.”

Principle 3: Finish discarding first.
Begin by discarding – EVERYTHING. When you think you have, check again. Cleaning and storing your belongings is not “tidying.” How can you plan to store belongings unless you first know what’s in your inventory? No “business” could be financially successful if it didn’t track it’s goods. Respect yourself and your earnings by discarding what doesn’t add to your values.

Principle 4: Tidy by category not location. The Fly Lady Cleaning Method makes good use of room by room tidying for those who struggle to focus. For others, the 15 minute bursts of cleaning as you travel room to room often results in shuffling items through the home and changing their locations which can obscure taking a full inventory of the items they own and possess. If you are confronted with a heap of clothing in your laundry room but do not place this heap beside all the clothing in your bedroom closets, the clothing in your storage, your coat rack beside your front door etc, you will not be able to take stock of any category of clothing that may be overabundant, under represented, or simply unnecessary.

Here is some inspiration for you!

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These are simply the pictures I am willing to share…what does this tell you?

It actually is SLOWLY turning into this:

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The lighting is awful it’s true. I will update with some pride as it happens. But back to the principles of Kon Mari…

Principle 5: Follow the correct order. In Kon Mari practice the correct order (taxonomy) is clothing, books, papers, komono (miscellany) and last, sentimental items. She is adamant that it’s this way for a reason that becomes self evident with practice. Her reasoning is the distracting affect that all inventory of ones personal investments can have on us. It’s also the spring that gave The Fly Lady cleaning method it’s readership and adherents.

Principle 6: Does it “Spark Joy?” If an item, ANY ITEM, DOES NOT THRILL YOU – GET RID OF IT. Don’t ask Padwan. Throw it OUT, donate it, take it to Good Will, Salvation Army, your place of worship, a school etc. But THANK THE ITEM and allow others to give it new meaning, value, purposes and say goodbye. You aren’t choosing what to discard; Your choosing WHAT TO KEEP! As she states eloquently on page 8, “By letting go of the things that have been in your life with a feeling of gratitude, you foster appreciation for, and a desire TO TAKE BETTER CARE OF, the things IN your life.”

So have I just made it sound extreme? It is for some of us I think. I think she’s right. I’ve been working on clothing for over a week. So far, I have organized each and EVERY clothing drawer and closet in an orderly fashion so I CAN ACTUALLY SEE WHAT I HAVE TO CHOOSE FROM! The horrors of ill informed decisions indeed have global impact. If you doubt me, remember that a true David Bowie fan once said “What is wrong with a mullet?”

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And then they saw this twist on the mullet:

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But we can all see the presence of prison agent orange…hanging in there…and so sprung a Revenge of Grunge 2015 moment on unsuspecting but “thoughtful” bohemians that looked (s) like this:

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But we all know it didn’t END here did it? This is where it ends…

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Remember those messy, unsightly, bat-crap-shit crazy disordered pictures above that display my disrespectful attitude towards my own earning power? The ones with obscene clutter on top of every surface in my domicile? For every “Joe Dirt” there is a “Bargain Betty” who shops Wal-Mart for everything she owns, in six rainbow colors that are worn a few times rather than one single piece of true tailored fashion that carries it’s value over DECADES. EVEN a simple Wal-Mart sweater that is WORN WITH JOY MORE THAN ONCE A MONTH UNTIL IT’S TOO THREADBARE TO BE WORN AGAIN is more respected than a drawer full of color coordinates beautifully stored but worn only twice a year.

Pick and choose for life is NOW. It’s not for “someday” in a “galaxy far, far away.”

Live now. Be joyful as much as one can. Regrets happen. War happens. And life ends sooner or later. Joy also happens. Miracles are ‘relative’ in the eyes of the witness not the recipient.

Let Go.

Boredom: What is it and How should we respond?

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What is Boredom? Why would anyone other than someone who is bored be interested about the topic? Why write about it unless your creating solutions to a problem? Could boredom ever be healthy? Is Boredom contagious?

Boredom is a feeling first and foremost. It lies at the root of many illnesses, so many in fact, that the modern tourist economy can be traced to the rise of consumer based economic theory. Entire forests have been felled to produce the volumes of literature devoted to dispelling this fearsome specter that brings chaos in its wake. The Archbishop of Wales opined:

“We are a deeply, dangerously bored society. And we’re reluctant to look for the root of that. Why do we want to escape from the glories and difficulties of everyday life? Why do we want to escape into gambling or drugs or any other kind of fantasy? Why have we created a culture which seems more in love with fantasy than reality? Whether that’s gambling or drugs or, for that matter, the national lottery, we should be asking “What’s happened to us? Why are we so bored?”

In a comment about the presumed differences between urbanites and suburbanites, Reinhard Kuhn states ” She is tired of the magazine that she is reading or the television show that she is watching and mixes another cocktail for herself. Or perhaps she telephones an equally bored friend and they talk for hours about nothing, or perhaps she drifts into an affair that means as little to her as the television show or magazine article.”

These descriptions aren’t a flattering picture of modern societies and womanhood are they? Is it an excuse for anti-feminism or for economic criticism, religious criticism or is it indicative of an adjective, a description that in its discursive slant, illustrates the problem that hides in plain sight?

Anais Nin

Richard Winter broaches the subject of boredom by listing adjectives to describe it.

  • Apathetic
  • drab
  • dull
  • colorless
  • ennui
  • humdrum
  • insipid
  • interminable
  • irksome
  • lifeless
  • lethargic
  • monotonous
  • mundane
  • repetitious
  • routine
  • stale
  • tedious
  • stodgy
  • tiresome
  • uninteresting
  • vapid
  • wearisome

Antonyms for Bored and Boredom are

  • interesting
  • absorbing
  • amusing
  • attractive
  • captivating
  • charismatic
  • compelling
  • delightful
  • engaging
  • engrossing
  • enthralling
  • entrancing
  • exotic
  • fascinating
  • gripping
  • riveting
  • stimulating
  • exciting

To bore someone is to weary them by “being dull, uninteresting or monotonous” and as Winter notes, is also mildly aggressive. To even argue that by enforcing boredom, we inflict pain on our spouse, our friends or loved ones, would require that we understand and recognize the emotion within ourselves.

Academics have only confused and conflated the problem of identifying emotions such as boredom with quotes such as this one: “a metaphor for the postmodern condition” – when writing about the emergence of the word into the cultural lexicon of the 1750’s!

Andy Warhol has summed up the modern view of boredom in his film Sleep where an audience (presumably pays) to watch a man sleep for 8 solid hours! Rest assured, the clip below is only a minute and a half long, and at that length, may be longer than some sexual encounters, which brings up the various maladies and health disorders associated with boredom.

Addictions, family dysfunction, abuses of communication between those who love one another, all these are yet more symptoms of undiagnosed boredom that we attempt to treat with medication or with wellness paradigms that fail to educate about the emotional states common to the human condition. We are taught to climb rock walls to learn new ways to get high, to try dating and sex and even unprotected risky sex before we are ready, and of course, there are always other impulse control disorders where boredom can be regarded as a trigger factor or as a symptom.

We typically associate boredom with under stimulation and monotony. This is the wellness logic behind advertisements promoting exercise and yoga, rock climbing and the outdoors. Romanticism recycled as a cure for the evils and perils of the modern worlds ills. We see this clearly mass marketed in TV shows like Preppers and academics routinely lampoon such “cultural backwardness” as “conspiracy culture” and on and on. As cited above, the term postmodern or one of its variations is trotted out and used to criticize everything and sundry that represents a rejection of “progress.”

But is it? All this, all these ideas are invalidated to avoid discussing an emotion: boredom.

In some spas flotation tanks or “sensory deprivation ” tanks are utilized to promote altered states of consciousness. How do they achieve this? The effect is achieved thru under stimulation. Hallucinations, impaired thought processes, restlessness and mood swings occur if too much time is spent in the tank. For this reason, most spas don’t have the staff to monitor guests mental health and elect not to offer the service. The point however about the side effects of boredom are profound.

Repetition also takes a lot of heat when the subject of boredom arises. Not only does it raise psychological questions that have fueled near culture wars about psychoanalysis, over medication and healthcare, it has been used as a reason to challenge universities that offer wellness programs, as evidence for cultural decline and economic malaise due to globalization.

Boredom. Such a fearsome beast. It’s almost enough to drive people to suicide and one might be pardoned for wondering if it indeed does. What of a once happily married couple who no longer delights in one another’s company? One begins drinking, the other has an affair. Or perhaps it’s drugs or sex or both. Who is to blame? Would suggesting both individuals lack emotional maturity encourage them to slow down and work on self-development help or harm?

What about the common internet troll? What about the chat rooms that proliferate online? I’ve always and still do compare them to buy, sell and trade magazines, or the Sunday shoppers where the occasional rant disguised as a public announcement are often published. Online, it’s easier to recognize a real gripe from some psychological grandstand. Chances are, boredom prompted their rendition of “Teen Spirit” in a “grown-up” venue.

Any parent can tell us about the value of repetition as well. Small children love to hear bedtime stories and never seem to get tired of them, the same ones in their early years. The same toys and blankets, the same voices and smells and to their parents delight, they love to see the same faces day after day. Unlike soured romances and faithless lovers, children and animals know who butters their bread.

Assembly workers are the poster children for the physical ills of repetition. When we’re young and when we allow ourselves to learn something new, we often find repetition has value. We learn 2+2 equals 4, we learn to walk, we learn to listen and to talk. When we get older, some of us learn to think! Athletes put up with a great deal of bodily repetition and show off the results.

Politics and economics are another example. J.M. Barbalet is a sociologist who noted that boredom is also relieved by conflict. Those who have experienced the luxury of distancing themselves from the national tragedy of September 11th, 2001may or may not have noticed that at the time, that a push for “evidence based medicine” had been percolating since the mid 90’s. What may not be as obvious were the effects upon related but distinct discourses and disciplines. Take psychology for example. Freud and Jung were both beginning to be subjected to the processes of not only peer review but presumably, “scientific rigor.” Academia was the excuse as it so often is for those who recognize and can quote the names of modern intellectual gladiators and their forebears. Economics is yet another arena. Naomi Wolf took up this theme rightly or wrongly in her book The Shock Doctrine. And we all have borne witness to what has occurred in American political venues and health care since that time. Meanwhile, criticism of “the French Nietzsche” was advanced and the critics opined it was time to think with “Nietzsche against Nietzsche” as early as 1991 in France. An English language publication of this criticism did not emerge until 1994. Some of us earn our sheepskins and outlive either or both our competitors and our friends and some of us die young. Regardless of what is said about this sordid scene and how everyone was oblivious, it requires a collective variety of denials to say so; Osama did notice. And he wasn’t alone. Those who understand and know the upshot of what this implies should take a second look at history.

Boredom? Say it ain’t so?