Tag Archives: Historiography

Arizona State seeks PhD. Research Associate for Obesity & Body Image study 

Occasionally LMT’s professional growth and development curves lead them beyond bodywork practice. For those with an academic background, those encountering the limits of continuing education without a master’s degree at the very least, and for prospective massage and bodywork students who intend to pursue research, this notice from Arizona State outlines one Avenue of approach. 

Best of Luck!

Arizona State University/Obesity Solutions—Post-Doctoral Research Associate—deadline March 15, 2017

The Mayo Clinic/ASU Obesity Solutions initiative, based at Arizona State University, seeks to hire a post-doctoral research associate.  The position will help design, lead, and directly manage a citizen-science project, Older and Wiser BITs (Body Image Talks): Citizen Scientists in the Valley of the Sun, to better understand the links between obesity-related stigma and aging. A major focus will be on better understanding ‘body talk’ and aging through collaboration with senior citizen-scientists.  The duties include training and mentoring graduate students, undergraduate students, and citizen-scientists as research collaborators in appropriate social science and linguistic methods; additional duties include managing the overall project approval and data collection process in senior living facilities and communities in and across Maricopa County, data analysis, and collaborating on publishing the findings in peer-reviewed journals. The position may also include outreach activities such as social and traditional media and public meetings, as a goal is to engage and empower citizens in self-advocacy techniques with regard to body stigma and other challenges to maintaining healthy body weights.

The post-doctoral research associate will work closely with Mayo Clinic/ASU Obesity Solutions and its affiliate faculty, staff, and student interns. This position demands a high level of collaboration within a large, complex, fast-moving transdisciplinary team, benefitting from a high level of adaptability. Anticipated start date will be June 2017, but may begin earlier by mutual agreement.  Only one fiscal year of appointment is anticipated at this time. This is a grant funded position. Anticipated ending date, June 30, 2018 depending on the actual start date.

Required Qualifications:

  • Recent PhD in anthropology, sociolinguistics or other relevant social science field
  •  Proven capacity to independently manage a research project from start to finish
  • Experience in the systematic application of social science methods in community-based research
  •  Current driver’s license
  •  Excellent interpersonal and communication skills

 

Desired Qualifications:

  • Proven record of academic publication and/or external grant receipt
  • Proven capacity to work effectively in a highly collaborative, team environment
  • Record of executing citizen science or public outreach activities
  • Experience with IRB processes
  • Experience in media, including social media platforms
  • Experience working with aging/senior populations
  • Experience training diverse undergraduate students
  • Skills in language-related analytic methods
  • Experience using MaxQDA
  • Fluency or near fluency in Spanish

 

Initial receipt of complete applications is March 15, 2017; if not filled review of complete applications will continue every week thereafter until the search is closed. To apply, please send electronically to Deborah.L.Williams@asu.edu  a brief cover letter and curriculum vitae. Background check is required for employment.

 

OBESITY SOLUTIONS brings together the world-renowned doctors of the Mayo Clinic distinguished scientists at Arizona State University, and many other universities, communities, businesses, and government to identify, test, and share innovative ways of addressing obesity. It is moving well beyond traditional modes of doing medicine and science, applying new approaches that are more multi-faceted, trans-disciplinary, innovative, person-centered and agile.

We offer a dynamic, collegial, and challenging work environment due to the pace of innovation, complex array of research and academic programs, and high profile initiatives.  For complete information seehttp://obesitysolutions.asu.edu

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. ASU’s full non-discrimination statement (ACD 401) is located on the ASU website at:https://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html   https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/



___________________________
Cindi SturtzSreetharan
Associate Professor 
School of Human Evolution and Social Change
Arizona State University

P.O. Box 872402 | Tempe, Arizona 85287-2402 | SHESC 


Repeal and Replace: “We’re doing THE DEMOCRATS a service.”

Like many of us around the world, I’m watching President elect Trumps press conference. Am I the only one staggering over the idealism in play? Apparently not: this news conference is being held in part over stock market fluctuations related to some of his comments. I’m not ready to speak to what I’m hearing point by point, but I stand by the insight and measured appraisal of my fellow citizens that this man may prove to be the best choice for America and the global economy right now.

It’s an exciting time for me, to be starting a new semester-quarter working toward my paralegal with Trump heading into office. I’ve had and continue to have, personal baggage that is worthy of grief, bitterness and THERAPY. I’m almost confused by the combination of reality and motivation Trump seems to clarify for me, simply by being HIMSELF. I realize that many people around the world find him to be out of sync with his fellow human beings. The degree of his deviations from what many DO CALL idealism, obscures difference about natural philosophy and definitions of idealism generally. Folks, this is THE BIG STUFF…My eyes truly are wide as flying saucers and I’ve not felt so comfortable IN HISTORY as I do now. I’ve been uncomfortable for OVER TEN YEARS. I’m not comfortable now but I’m a bit more comfortable than I’ve been which is an improvement. Wiggle Room! 

I am holding back an opinion for the interim about idealism. Here’s why: For any conscious actor, any individual, seeking to erect universal standards applicable for human beings IN ADDITION TOO oneself, dualism is the most insidious counterpoint. Dualism itself includes double standards by default. At LEAST TWO SETS OF BOOKS: AXIOLOGY.

Since I’m my first and only student, this is MY QUESTION: At what point is AXIOLOGY REFLEXIVE? My question for others, is at what point, does the question two paragraphs above depart FROM “Both-And” and become an equivocation fallacy that creates a separate “peace,” politely speaking?

Ideology is suspected of solipsism around the world logically. Given this, what am I, what are we, how are YOU DEAR READER, categorizing and allocating VALUE?

Oh Lawd. I do see Paris, but it seems I’ve never seen France

Over at Jason Colavito’s blog, he, as usual is bemoaning the Age of Balkanization. A recent target of his may be of note to practitioners and consumers of reflexology.

Colavito’s target is not a teacher or continuing education provider for reflexology in the United States. I have not researched her or the father in law whom Colavito took historical issue with. However, Mr. Colavito made her reflexology background part of his article headline.

The topic and subject matter clearly begs for a reply, which is why I refuse to not laugh.

That noted, CAM practitioners and consumers of reflexology and it’s history may find Mr. Colavito’s blog noteworthy as I have.

Several years ago, I blew a gasket with both Massage Warehouse and news outlet AlterNet over poorly chosen advertising venues and articles on fringe history and pseudo science, tied to CAM therapies in general. I have trolled Mr. Colavito’s blog ever since like a faithful drone overcome with unrequited affection.

While Mr. Colavito’s objections are independent from my own and his academic background in this regard does trump mine, I chose to voice my opinion and then mind my own business professionally since then.

I begin my paralegal associates studies later this month. I have indeed decided to forgo Graduate School in favor of something more personally meaningful and cost effective.

Please do stop by to visit Mr. Colavito. There is more to his subject matter than many of his critics will admit too in public and vice versa.

The Satanic Verses or Secular “Apologetics?”

I was reminded today of two different movie dialogues, both of which were spoken by seasoned comedians. One was indeed a comedy but the other was a tragedy. The lives of each comic have followed the courses laid out in those films more or less.

Bill Murray in the comedy Stripes has a line where he’s winning over an audience and courting their vanity. “It’s the stories you tell” he exclaims. Robin Williams in Dead Poets Society asks his students “What will your verse be?”

It’s June of 2016. It’s an election year. Stanford Professor Francis Fukuyama’s thesis “The End of History and The Last Man” has recently been ‘annotated’ it appears by Joseph Crawford of The University of Exeter in the UK. Another Professor of German Literature who spent 30 years at UC Santa Barbara before heading to Switzerland, Lawrence Rickles states in his book The Vampire Lectures “What is a historical fact? It’s AFTER THE FACT.” Academics will note the curious change in my linked citations. It seems that once again, Wikipedia editors could not provide a link to Professor Rickles profile at the State Academy in Switzerland or an English translation of the schools website.

Across the pond and in the Tennessee foothills of Appalachia, far from either Ivory Tower mentioned above, I have found a moment of peace, along with new books to burden myself and others with moving. I can’t say I have acquired “new” academic idols just yet, but give me time to digest a few things. It’s a mere year and six months of a moment that I pray will take me to international waters where jurisdiction is as legally ambiguous as Art is.

Depending on how the story of the Enlightenment is told, different outcomes emerge. Historiography is another word for ‘style’ depending on who is teaching, and WHAT they’re teaching. If there is lingering doubt about the origins of what it takes to create modern “conspiracy”, I do recommend the books authored by the Professors above.

Perhaps when the defacto political prisoner that both the Federal Government and my home State of Alabama cannot claim was created in isolation as a literary “decentered subject,” or an “axiological exercise” (might we ALL pause to recall, across Both Sides of EACH POND) then perhaps the POINT of Professor Fukuyama’s witty title will do more than “trickle down” the Appalachian Trail but also “Ride the Freedom Train” North.

History of Massage Therapy

Theraputic

The History of Massage as a modern phenomena or definable school of Western thought and practice can only be traced back to the 1800′s. Despite this, there are many references to rubbing with oils and unguents for health and medicinal purposes going back to around 1500 B.C. in China.

Many sources take this number back even further but at such a point, the historiography begins to get shaky and the evidence becomes isolated into fragmentary images depicted in stone or the odd text that managed to survive the ravages of time.

For instance, The Nei Ching or The Yellow Emperors Classic of Internal Medicine which describes massage, can only be reliably dated to 1500 B.C. but many scholars attempt to push that date back further to 2500 B.C.

Chinese yellow emperor internal medicine classic

The historical debate about Chinese origins centers on the Chinese custom of attributing new works to popular figures such as a favorite Emperor as a gesture of respect. I am willing to leave such historical speculation to others and choose instead to concentrate on the most reliable facts and figures.

Ancient Egyptian carvings also depict massage and Julius Caesar was known to have massage administered for neuralgia.

history_of_reflexology

The ancient science of Ayurveda also advocates the use of massage and massage was common for participants in sporting events in ancient Greece. In ancient Rome, as in ancient Egypt, massage was offered to the public in bath houses and temple complexes as part and parcel of the process of relaxation and bathing.

ATL-029850

You may be surprised to learn that there is no written definition of massage from ancient times. Early physicians advocated friction and rubbing of the body and while they did describe how to do this rubbing and why, none wrote a definition of the discipline. Greek physician Galen gave us a description when he wrote Hygiene, stating that ‘the rubbing should be of many sorts with strokes and circuits of the hands, carrying them not only from above, down but from below up, but also subvertically, obliquely, transversely and subtransversely.” Despite there being no professional definition, what we do know, is that people have been rubbing one another for a variety of purposes almost as long as we have existed and that the practice shows no signs of dying out.

Massage is a healthy and vibrant expression of care and compassion for ourselves and our fellow human beings. In the Western world, massage was part of movement therapy and gymnastics before it was adopted by medical physicians. Ambrose Pare and Clement Joseph Tissot both wrote about massage in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries but it was not until Per Henrick Ling arrived on the scene that massage as we know it began to take shape around advances in medical knowledge. Lings work combined movement therapy and gymnastics with soft tissue manipulation and became known as Swedish massage. In fact, it isn’t until the turn of the 20th century that the word massage comes into its own as a medical term. It was John Harvey Kellogg of Battle Creek Sanitarium who defined the traditional Swedish terms, effleurage, petrissage, and tapotement, as ‘massage.’ Despite this and many other early references to massage by Western medical doctors, massage is still regarded as a complimentary and alternative health practice or CAM by the AMA and not as a medical one. The standard-bearer for Professional Massage Therapy is the AMTA, which was formed in 1943 and is itself a partner with the American Medical Association. In 1992, the AMTA initialized the creation of the NCBTMB or National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork, which is one of the primary organizations for certified massage therapists. A newcomer to the field is the FSMTB or Federation of State Massage Therapy Boards. The FSMTB also offers a recognized certification for its adherents.

There are many types of massage and I could not name them all if I tried! The most common therapeutic forms are Swedish, Sports, Deep Tissue and Neuromuscular Therapy to name only a few. There are more ‘exotic’ derivatives, such as Shiastu, Lomilomi and Reflexology as well as the more intensive varieties such as Rolfing, Trager and the Alexander technique which require separate and additional training. All fall under the broad rubric of massage.

etymology_header

The etymology of the word massage itself is fraught with political history. As it stands, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Sanskrit and Semitic origins for the word massage are all touted by various vested interests with axes to grind about why their position is the correct one and how History itself, is validated by their point of view. As an example of the seeming lack of consensus have a look at the following examples of the etymology of the word massage, all from online and verifiable sources.

  • Merriam-Webster @ M-W.com: French, from masser to massage, from Arabic massa to stroke. First Known Use in English: circa 1860
  • Webster’s New World @ YourDictionary.com: French < masser, to massage < Arabic massa, to touch
  • American Heritage @ YourDictionary.com: French, from masser, to massage, from Arabic masaḥa, to stroke, anoint; see mšḥ in Semitic roots or massa, to touch; see mšš in Semitic roots.
  • Collins English @ Dictionary.com: 19thCentury: from French, from masser to rub; see mass [NOTE: at ‘’mass’’, ‘’mass’’ is stated to be from Latin ‘’massa’’]
  • Chambers Dictionary @ ChambersHarrap.co.uk:: 19th Century: French, from masser to massage, from Greek massein to knead. [question: directly modern Greek? or ancient Greek along unspecified path?]
  • Concise OED @ OxfordDictionaries.com: late 19th century: from French, from masser ‘knead, treat with massage’, probably from Portuguese amassar ‘knead’, from massa ‘dough’
  • Random House @ Dictionary.com: 1875–80; < F, equiv. to mass ( er ) to massage (< Ar massa to handle) + -age

I am not a linguist, but it seems that there is a great deal of work to be done when it comes to the History of Massage etymology, as there is no definitive agreement. But I am willing to believe that at least one of these dictionaries is correct. What interests my inner nerd about such issues are the implications of each position historically and how those positions relate to broader worldviews. I don’t have the linguistic training to discern the answer for myself, so I have to come to a conclusion by going the long way around. It comes from my contextual nature and the style of learning I picked up as a child who loved to read and discern big words from the contexts in which they were used. I know I may have lost many of you with this tangent and I apologize if so!

Suffice it to say, the history of massage is varied and vast and encompasses the history of almost every culture on the planet. My hope for Massage in the 21st century is that it will not be afraid to redefine itself as required to meet the needs of its practitioners and those who seek them out. Any practice that has survived for so long throughout and across history should not be relegated to the backwaters of Empire but should be embraced by the best and the brightest among us as offering something of tremendous value and lasting significance.

References

http://www.thebodyworker.com/history.htm

http://www.wischik.com/lu/massage/ljwhistory.html

http://www.recreationtherapy.com/history/rthistory1.htm

http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/forums/viewthread/2346/

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=Massage&searchmode=none