Category Archives: Chiropractic

Apothecanna: Cannibis infused Spa products

image

Where there’s smoke there is fire and the cannabis cloud over Colorado appears to be lingering like smog on a otherwise clear day. Cannabis proponent Apothecanna has positioned itself beyond the pale, as an adjunct measure in pain management and only time will tell if they can remain straight enough to keep their wellness branding intact.

I wrote this piece originally in June of 2015 and removed it from this blog over a reservation about logical reasoning summed up simply by “begging the question.” But let’s talk products for now.

image

Apothecanna does offer a variety of scents that leave the 1960’s behind.

The statement on their website detailing the benefits of their “natural” products Topical Cannabis, Hemp Lotion, & THC Spray (located under the tab “learn” and “apothecanna massage”) is simple and basic:

Revitalizing botanicals like arnica and capsaicin combine with topical marijuana to provide natural herbal pain relief .

The Marketing is both Spartan and clever.

“Here at Apothecanna, we’re committed to providing innovative topical pain relievers that combine topical cannabis with other healing and soothing botanicals for a more natural option for topical pain relief. Unlike conventional topical pain relief cream products, our cannabis calming cream offer pain relief without unpleasant “medicine” scents, instead incorporating sense-soothing botanicals like lavender, chamomile, and frankincense. These botanicals make using our topical marijuana products more enjoyable, contributing to a sense of well being that can aid the healing process. In addition to our full line of cannabis cream and THC spray products for pain relief, which are available at over 200 Colorado medical marijuana centers, we also offer several invigorating, calming, and pain relieving cream products made with hemp and arnica cream, as well as other botanicals to soothe your skin as well as your senses.”

Rejuvenate your skin and senses with topical cannabis cream and botanical skin therapies from Apothecanna.

Under the “About” tab are three discreet paragraphs that provide a brief nod to both legality and their position on the role of natural philosophy in society at large.

image

By reordering the brands statements, it may be a bit more obvious to educated consumers and those who question the politics involved, how the advent of Apothecanna will impact the Spa and Wellness Industry. And in particular, the Professional Massage Community which may utilize such products IN TANDEM with mainstream pain management professionals.

Let’s break it down like any syllogism, but let’s do it backwards and examine the logic of the marketing.

“Our mission at Apothecanna is to spread the wisdom of traditional plant medicine. We believe in the fundamental right of access to the healing powers of nature and promote sustainable interaction with the world around us.”

Preceeding this ‘tidbit’ is the following ‘tidbit.”

“We do not use artificial ingredients, fillers, parabens and only test on humans. We believe that natural treatments are the best treatments, and strive to create products with uncompromised purity, quality, and functionality.”

And the page begins with this introduction:

“Apothecanna is a natural apothecary featuring cannabis extract as the primary active ingredient due to its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Our formulations combine cannabis with other organic and wild crafted essential oils to create highly functional topical treatments for pain and stress relief, while delivering a host of skin nurturing benefits.”

Viewed and analyzed from last statement to first, Apothecanna’s marketing strategy seems to be suffering from marijuana induced paranoia if not ordinary anxiety. Remember this assessment proceeds in reverse order from their official website circa 2015!

image

The first (last) CLAIM Apothecanna puts forward, is that their products have scientifically proven value. (This is TRUE of Cannabis- as science has admitted.)

The second or (middle) premise Apothecanna offers is that their products are 100% “Natural” and that they TEST only on humans.

In the third (first) STATEMENT that in traditional logic would be called a premise, Apothecanna DOES INDEED draw a CONCLUSION predicated on the two preceding premises! Want some pseudoscience wellness professionals or just a side of religion to go with your own and your clients health investments?

Consumers are informed of Apothecannas “rights” and significantly there is an appeal to nature for sovereign status as if this is an innate right, protected by the United States constitution and by the State of Colorado. Don’t choke on Abraham Lincoln’s comment that The Bill of rights “Is a REBUKE” or the fact that it’s not A LAW in or of itself. 4th amendment is mere Axiology? Taste? Genre? 

Oh my! Isn’t this Gnosticism Mitt Romney’s and John McCain’s territory? Colorado did have a FEMALE TEA PARTY INCUMBENT BATTLE DIDN’T THEY…

Since when does any government, at the national or state level have an ability to regulate “unalienable” rights? Gnosticism, gender and Lawd at all the LEGAL PROSTITUTION NEXT DOOR IN NEVADA…Neither LEGAL governing body DOES have that right pro Mblex crusaders. American laws deal with ‘inalienable rights.’ LOOK AT THAT “science based” MARKETING NOW.

The “premise” that any class system is subject to the economic system, which is presumably subject to the political system, which in turn is subject to the legal system, which then, and only then, is subject to a religious system…with an ethical framework, such as one that acknowledges and ensures ‘rights‘ which entail free will, are now on display.

Given that in 99% if not most instances, the defacto and default premise that an esthetics license is required, in addition to a Bachelor’s degree to work for a Professional Spa Product Line and that LMT’s with a Bachelor’s degree are overlooked if they have no outside B2B sales experience ought to give the Spa and Esthetics industry something to mull over when considering the SUBSTANCE of education.

Consider for instance this “new” education offering that is scarcely 20 years old: Disability Studies. It would seem “science” v. “management” rather than “pain” is the canker sore in the post-modern lotus?

image

I will leave it to the “moral educators” with political axes to grind about bell jars, States right’s, healthcare and massage monopolies on entry level right to practice (that the FSMTB fails to call collusion but most certainly calls patriotism,) to pander to their fellow citizens about universal relativism and plan for the future conspiracy theories this trend will no doubt spawn.

Until Next Time Campers!

Updated AGAIN! Jane Buckle PhD, RN misquoted and referenced by Young Living Esential Oils Conference

Author of Clinical Aromatherapy, Jane Buckle, PhD, RN recently learned that her published work had been misrepresented by Young Living Essential Oils at a recent conference in Utah. While her response is on the picture that accompanies this post1 Aromatherapy and is big enough to read above, additional notes by Gabriel Mojay about the research snafu are below:

  • 1″. Basil (Ocimum basilicum) is mentioned only once in Jane’s book, and not in relation to toxicity or safety. ‘Essential Oil Safety’ by Tisserand & Young states that Ocimum basilicum ct estragole essential oil should not be taken in oral doses.”

2. “Clove is indeed mentioned on p78 of her book — in the context of a referenced case of oral ingestion in which 5-10 ml resulted in seizure and coma. 25 ml, as quoted by Young Living, would possibly be fatal. “

3. “Hyssop is also mentioned on p78, with reference to a case of oral ingestion in which 10-20 ml resulted in convulsions — not just vomiting, as Young Living suggests.”

4. “Oregano is mentioned three times in Jane’s book, but not once in relation to toxicity or safety. According to ‘Essential Oil Safety’, oral doses of Origanum vulgare essential oil are contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding, diabetic medication, anticoagulant medication, major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, and other bleeding disorders.”

5. “Sage is mentioned three times in Jane’s book, but not with respect to toxicity or safety. According to ‘Essential Oil Safety’, Salvia officinalis essential oil should not be taken in oral doses.”

6. “Wintergreen is mentioned on three pages in Jane’s book, but not specifically in relation to oral toxicity. According to ‘Essential Oil Safety’, oral doses of Gaultheria fragrantissima syn. G. procumbens essential oil are contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding, anticoagulant medication, major surgery, hemophilia, and other bleeding disorders. The dosage quoted by Young Living as somehow ‘safe’ is almost 50% greater than the maximum adult daily oral dose recommended by Tisserand & Young.

I posted this article on July 5th, 2014.

I didn’t think much about it but did share the article on Facebook with various groups and on my own timeline and professional page. To be honest, from a small business standpoint, lots of small businesses carry Young Living Essential Oils. But this is not all about money. While I have never used this product or worked with it in a professional capacity in a Spa, I will say that Jane Buckle’s response lacks nuance and depth for several reasons.

  • This may be a simple matter of inappropriate preparation and presentation for a conference. When this became known and public, the appropriate business and ethical response would be to issue a press release, note the error and issue a correction. No harm – No foul. So far, Young Living has not responded to my knowledge and the blogosphere, including me, may need to double check our facts before picking up strange memes on Facebook! Time will tell.
  • While Jane is entitled to defend the integrity of her own work, copyright, authorship and research, the attitude her comment displays is not the best way to address the issue of research literacy both in the mainstream medical community or in the alternative health and wellness community. Obviously, just because Jane Buckle is an author does not make her an educator or a teacher and frankly, this shows in her comments. That said, I have known a number of nurses over the years with varying degrees of academics behind them. I would not put it past any of them to run thru a crowded theatre yelling “Fire!”. If research  was truly adhered to by MD’s and RN’s among many others, there would not be such an emphasis on Evidence Based Practices being adopted across the board by the Health Care Industry. Forgive me Jane, but as a graduate student in Health Care Administration, your pride is showing.
  • Young Living needs to issue a Press Release. That is just basic professional industry conduct and ethics. Period.

Young Living Essential Oils did respond to this blog post. They included this post in their July 6th, 2014 Twitter newsletter. While it’s not the correction that I am sure Jane Buckle would like to see in print, they clearly are not hiding the mistake from their distributors or customers and clearly have no problem with the notes and corrections made by educator Gabriel Mojay. I didn’t intend to ride Jane’s thunder but got a free ride! For a humble blogger and would be grad student, having a Facebook meme get featured in a well known companies newsletter is flattering! Thank you Young Living Essential Oils!

The detailed notes citing the errors at the conference were made by Gabriel Mojay
The Institute of Traditional Herbal Medicine & Aromatherapy
gm@aromatherapy-studies.com
http://www.aromatherapy-studies.com