Category Archives: Aromatherapy

Apothecanna: Cannibis infused Spa products

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Where there’s smoke there is fire and the cannabis cloud over Colorado appears to be lingering like smog on a otherwise clear day. Cannabis proponent Apothecanna has positioned itself beyond the pale, as an adjunct measure in pain management and only time will tell if they can remain straight enough to keep their wellness branding intact.

I wrote this piece originally in June of 2015 and removed it from this blog over a reservation about logical reasoning summed up simply by “begging the question.” But let’s talk products for now.

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Apothecanna does offer a variety of scents that leave the 1960’s behind.

The statement on their website detailing the benefits of their “natural” products Topical Cannabis, Hemp Lotion, & THC Spray (located under the tab “learn” and “apothecanna massage”) is simple and basic:

Revitalizing botanicals like arnica and capsaicin combine with topical marijuana to provide natural herbal pain relief .

The Marketing is both Spartan and clever.

“Here at Apothecanna, we’re committed to providing innovative topical pain relievers that combine topical cannabis with other healing and soothing botanicals for a more natural option for topical pain relief. Unlike conventional topical pain relief cream products, our cannabis calming cream offer pain relief without unpleasant “medicine” scents, instead incorporating sense-soothing botanicals like lavender, chamomile, and frankincense. These botanicals make using our topical marijuana products more enjoyable, contributing to a sense of well being that can aid the healing process. In addition to our full line of cannabis cream and THC spray products for pain relief, which are available at over 200 Colorado medical marijuana centers, we also offer several invigorating, calming, and pain relieving cream products made with hemp and arnica cream, as well as other botanicals to soothe your skin as well as your senses.”

Rejuvenate your skin and senses with topical cannabis cream and botanical skin therapies from Apothecanna.

Under the “About” tab are three discreet paragraphs that provide a brief nod to both legality and their position on the role of natural philosophy in society at large.

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By reordering the brands statements, it may be a bit more obvious to educated consumers and those who question the politics involved, how the advent of Apothecanna will impact the Spa and Wellness Industry. And in particular, the Professional Massage Community which may utilize such products IN TANDEM with mainstream pain management professionals.

Let’s break it down like any syllogism, but let’s do it backwards and examine the logic of the marketing.

“Our mission at Apothecanna is to spread the wisdom of traditional plant medicine. We believe in the fundamental right of access to the healing powers of nature and promote sustainable interaction with the world around us.”

Preceeding this ‘tidbit’ is the following ‘tidbit.”

“We do not use artificial ingredients, fillers, parabens and only test on humans. We believe that natural treatments are the best treatments, and strive to create products with uncompromised purity, quality, and functionality.”

And the page begins with this introduction:

“Apothecanna is a natural apothecary featuring cannabis extract as the primary active ingredient due to its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Our formulations combine cannabis with other organic and wild crafted essential oils to create highly functional topical treatments for pain and stress relief, while delivering a host of skin nurturing benefits.”

Viewed and analyzed from last statement to first, Apothecanna’s marketing strategy seems to be suffering from marijuana induced paranoia if not ordinary anxiety. Remember this assessment proceeds in reverse order from their official website circa 2015!

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The first (last) CLAIM Apothecanna puts forward, is that their products have scientifically proven value. (This is TRUE of Cannabis- as science has admitted.)

The second or (middle) premise Apothecanna offers is that their products are 100% “Natural” and that they TEST only on humans.

In the third (first) STATEMENT that in traditional logic would be called a premise, Apothecanna DOES INDEED draw a CONCLUSION predicated on the two preceding premises! Want some pseudoscience wellness professionals or just a side of religion to go with your own and your clients health investments?

Consumers are informed of Apothecannas “rights” and significantly there is an appeal to nature for sovereign status as if this is an innate right, protected by the United States constitution and by the State of Colorado. Don’t choke on Abraham Lincoln’s comment that The Bill of rights “Is a REBUKE” or the fact that it’s not A LAW in or of itself. 4th amendment is mere Axiology? Taste? Genre? 

Oh my! Isn’t this Gnosticism Mitt Romney’s and John McCain’s territory? Colorado did have a FEMALE TEA PARTY INCUMBENT BATTLE DIDN’T THEY…

Since when does any government, at the national or state level have an ability to regulate “unalienable” rights? Gnosticism, gender and Lawd at all the LEGAL PROSTITUTION NEXT DOOR IN NEVADA…Neither LEGAL governing body DOES have that right pro Mblex crusaders. American laws deal with ‘inalienable rights.’ LOOK AT THAT “science based” MARKETING NOW.

The “premise” that any class system is subject to the economic system, which is presumably subject to the political system, which in turn is subject to the legal system, which then, and only then, is subject to a religious system…with an ethical framework, such as one that acknowledges and ensures ‘rights‘ which entail free will, are now on display.

Given that in 99% if not most instances, the defacto and default premise that an esthetics license is required, in addition to a Bachelor’s degree to work for a Professional Spa Product Line and that LMT’s with a Bachelor’s degree are overlooked if they have no outside B2B sales experience ought to give the Spa and Esthetics industry something to mull over when considering the SUBSTANCE of education.

Consider for instance this “new” education offering that is scarcely 20 years old: Disability Studies. It would seem “science” v. “management” rather than “pain” is the canker sore in the post-modern lotus?

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I will leave it to the “moral educators” with political axes to grind about bell jars, States right’s, healthcare and massage monopolies on entry level right to practice (that the FSMTB fails to call collusion but most certainly calls patriotism,) to pander to their fellow citizens about universal relativism and plan for the future conspiracy theories this trend will no doubt spawn.

Until Next Time Campers!

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Licensure and Portability: National Certification Board teams up with British Education company ITEC to offer internationally recognized massage curriculum

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The National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork announced on March 14th, 2015 that they have partnered with ITEC, a British education company specializing in international credentialing. The goal is to facilitate ‘portability’ and ‘standardization’ for the massage profession. This partnership is similar to ISPA’s Spa Certifications that have been available to members and non members since around 2004.

ITEC describes themselves as a “an examination board” specializing in Beauty & Spa Therapy, Hairdressing, Complementary Therapies, Sports & Fitness Training and Customer Service. ITEC has hubs in London, South Africa, Asia and the Pacific in addition to representation in Ireland and the United States of America. What more could a Spa therapist ask for? Let’s take a cursory look.

ITEC-Logo(3)

Student benefit highlights include:

  • The benefit to the student is that they hold a certification that is recognised by employers in over 40 countries worldwide. The ITEC/NCB partnership will open doors to employment around the globe.
  • The ITEC Certification also means that the students have been benchmarked against other student’s from all over the world and achieved International status. No matter where a student’s studies for an ITEC certification the assessment is exactly the same which maintains standardisation around the globe.

School benefit highlights include:

  • curriculum benchmarked against sister schools in 40 different countries.
  • marketing opportunity for your institution.

What a blessing it would have been for me, had this option been available when I first graduated from massage school in 1998. I have family who immigrated to the USA, including my maternal grandmother who became a naturalized citizen. Both my maternal uncles were eligible for dual citizenship at birth. I have known professionals who hailed from Japan and studied massage therapy in London, worked with supervisors from The Netherlands and many other countries. Some former coworkers grew up overseas and started families during their travels. Many of my former coworkers have traveled the globe at various levels of the wellness industry from line positions in the Spa to Spa Management. For those of us who have lived such lives and whose families are indeed multi cultural if somewhat scattered, this is a welcome addition to massage education.

However, speaking from an American perspective in a non professional or educational context, if like me, you were blindsided by the “patriotic” and unquestionably “morally validated” emergence of the FSMTB (while working for a globally recognized, multi-national hospitality conglomerate) this may amuse you or at least make you pause for a moment of reflection.

What possible drawbacks may be found in this new educational partnership for students, educators, the massage and allied esthetics and cosmetology professions and for the spa industry?

One angle to consider is the current lay of the professional landscape. The FSMTB despite it’s monopoly on entry level credentialing that some have elevated to the status of positive law or done so in ignorance and stupidity, is only a monopoly for lack of competition at present. The addition of an international credential by the NCB is no skin off their nose or professionals backs.

For educators, the issues are different. Standardization of curriculums across international lines will necessitate the creation of new programs in participating schools. Adding ITEC curriculum to an existing education program need not require massage educators too, in the words of the NCB: “Agree to merge/map your curriculum(s) to ITEC’s International Diploma in Holistic Massage or any other specialty certifications you wish to offer.”

Why would an ITEC/NCB certification require a school to alter existing or prior proven curriculums that would or could remain independent from the ‘international’ certification program? Why not just add the NCB/ITEC international certification as a new program offering and be done with it? That is what Educational Program Directors do – design curriculums.

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However, there are strategic reasons some schools may choose to partner with the NCB and ITEC specifically for the above referenced purpose.

Rhetoric exists for a reason. That said, if I were in charge of the NCB news, I would have chosen different language or crafted a completely different sentence to express this requirement. I often blog with curt language. Apparently, I am not the only one as the NCB quote above illustrates.

From the standpoint of esthetics education and cosmetology education, there should not be a great deal of difference for private institutions. There is no mention of two year community colleges and I know of no reason to presume that they would be ineligible candidates to provide this new certification. I would think they would be some of the biggest supporters and possibly better suited to have the ability to add to international standardization thru educational program development.

I will be musing on this topic for a bit. I’m sitting with the idea for the moment like it’s tea in a kettle or an old time coffee percolator. I will catch the scent in a bit and I will see where it leads me. As will we all.

Good Luck NCB and ITEC. Better late than never!

http://www.ncbtmb.org/itec

http://www.itecworld.co.uk/ncbtmb/

http://www.itecworld.co.uk/home/Registration/

 

 

Open letter to DoTerra and Young Living: FDA reprimands are an opportunity and a challenge

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Last year, the FDA issued a warning letter to both Do Terra and Young Living Essential Oils CEO’s about the activities of their distributor networks.

The letter to Young Living states in part: “You market your Young Living Essential Oil products through paid consultants; your compensation plan for your consultants is explained on your website http://www.youngliving.com/en_US/opportunity/compensation-plan. Your consultants promote many of your Young Living Essential Oil Products for conditions such as, but not limited to, viral infections (including ebola), Parkinson’s disease, autism, diabetes, hypertension, cancer, insomnia, heart disease, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), dementia, and multiple sclerosis, that are not amenable to self-diagnosis and treatment by individuals who are not medical practitioners. Consumers interested in your Young Living Essential Oil products are then redirected by your consultants to your website, http://www.youngliving.com, to purchase your products and/or register as members (i.e., consultants)”.[1]

The letter to DoTerra states in part: “Your products are marketed through the website http://www.anytimeessentials.com/ and through paid “consultants,” http://www.anytimeessentials.com/work-home/, otherwise referred to as “wellness advocates,” http://www.mydoterra.com/. Your consultants promote your above mentioned dōTERRA Essential Oil products for conditions including, but not limited to, viral infections (including ebola), bacterial infections, cancer, brain injury, autism, endometriosis, Grave’s Disease, Alzheimer’s Disease, tumor reduction, ADD/ADHD,  and other conditions that are not amenable to self-diagnosis and treatment by individuals who are not medical practitioners. Moreover, your consultants redirect consumers to your website, http://www.doterra.com, to register as a customer or member (i.e., consultant), and to purchase your dōTERRA Essential Oil products.”

Here’s a PART of the rub if it’s not already obvious: “Your products are prescription drugs as defined in section 503(b)(1)(A) of the Act [21 U.S.C. § 353(b)(1)(A)]) for some of the claims made for them because, in light of their toxicity or other potentiality for harmful effect, the method of their use, or the collateral measures necessary to their use, they are not safe for use except under the supervision of a practitioner licensed by law to administer them.”

When I come across responses or rebuttals to the information above I often find the same tropes repeated and an absence of detail and appropriate framing of the issues involved. Here are my suggestions for both DoTerra and Young Living corporate organizations on how to go about revamping their training and policy procedures to avoid such issues.

  • Show some respect for philosophy and history by acknowledging the value of diversity rather than avoiding the burden of education. i.e., Invest in your organizational longevity and your distributors long term patronage thru enhanced education offerings.
  • Create partnerships with Aromatherapy, Business and CAM educators that would offer perks for distributors who advance their education level with college degrees or appropriate certifications.
  • Redefine your branding strategy to clearly distinguish who your customers are and why.
  •  Be mindful of nepotism.

Crowd Source Promotes Prostitution over a 14.7 Billion Dollar Spa Industry

Writers and Professional LMT’s take note! I recently submitted a 200 word answer to a basic question in what I thought was a delicate and discreet way. CrowdSource’s stated question was worded in a way I found suspect as a Professional for both the taxonomy and language used to phrase the question. What I wrote follows but first note the rejection I received.

We are unable to use this HIT: Your article was flagged for the following issues: Your content fails to answer the question. Your work contains unapproved source links. Source links provided no information with respect to the question. Content did not answer the question. Resources are supposed to be to the exact page you found your information, not just the homepage.

Answer Type: Opinion
Question:
What information can be obtained from massage parlor reviews?
Category: Business & Finance > Business Resources
Provide your first resource link:
http://www.experienceispa.com/
Provide your second resource link: (optional)
http://www.amtamassage.org/index.html
Provide your third resource link: (optional)
https://www.fsmtb.org/
Provide your fourth resource link: (optional)
http://www.abmp.com/
Provide your fifth resource link: (optional)
http://www.spafinder.com/about/industry_news.jsp

Answer:
The Massage Industry does not recognize the term “Massage Parlor” as a legal enterprise or as an accurate depiction and representation of the massage profession. Due to the societal practice of double standards which conflate and abuse both the massage profession and the spa industry which brought in 14.7 million dollars in revenue last year according to The International Spa Association, information obtained from a ‘massage parlour review’ is suspect.
Directions: Check here ONLY if your first sentence gave the direct answer to the question. Do not check otherwise.
Additional Details:
Use of the word “parlor” is a historical nod to the Gilded Age. In the modern era, use of this term is suspect among spa industry professionals and among those professions broadly associated with the concepts of Spas in general. The International Spa Association or ISPA, represents a total of 20,183 spas around the world. Spa Finder and Conde Nast Traveller among others, provide reputable information and reviews of spas around the world from industry insiders and professionals. Spas provide a number of services in relation to wellness and broadly speaking, services related to cosmetology. These professionals are represented by a number of licensing, certifying, and educational organizations, public and private. If a consumer is seeking sexual services, they may wish to conduct quests for information in more discreet language that does not conflate and undermine industries that create global opportunity and jobs for many people around the world. Hospitality, Tourism, Cosmetology, Massage, Esthetics, Philosophy, Health, Wellness and associated fields are not the private preserves of sexual hedonists and are not open to linguistic colonization. Therefore information that utilizes this terminology will necessarily be conflicting and a source of conflict as long as it creates artificial divisions that can only be termed post modern from an industry and professional standpoint.

Chakra of the Week: Sahasrara

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Sahasrara: The Great Sound

The Sahasrara Chakra symbolizes detachment from illusion. This Chakra is the heart of metaphysics and in Hindu religion and philosophy, it is said to be the doorway to higher realms of consciousness. Again, this information is for reference purposes only and is not intended as spiritual or religious instruction.

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Suggested Aromatherapy

  • Neroli
  • Frankincense
  • Jasmine
  • Rose
  • Ylang Ylang

Ingredients:

  • 4 drops Frankincense
  • 5 drops Neroli
  • 4 drops Lavender

Directions:

Combine oils. This recipe can be worn as a personal essence or body oil prior to meditation. Re-apply as desired.

Ingredients:

  • 1 drop lavender essential oil
  • 1 drop patchouli essential oil
  • 5 drops Frankincense oil
  • 1 ounce carrier oil

Directions:

Combine essential oils. Apply a few drops to the tips of fingers, and massage into temples for an aroma-enhanced meditation. For maximum benefits, apply one drop under the nose, too.

 

Chakra of the Week: Ajna

 

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Ajna: The Summoning and Command Chakra

Ajna is the Chakra pop culture knows as the Third Eye. It is believed to facilitate spiritual communication such as visions and psychic powers and phenomena.

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Tea for the Anja Chakra

Suggested Aromatherapy

This aromatic blend can be used in several ways. Experiment with the recipe to find what works for you.

Ingredients:

Directions:

Combine ingredients and massage into temples or neck and shoulders. Dab onto pulse points as a personal essence.

Room Diffuser Blend or Body Mist

Ingredients:

Directions:

Blend oils, then add to 1/4 cup water in a candle lamp. Or add oils to a pad with plug in room diffuser. Breathe in this fruity-herbal aroma to create a fresh vision-expanding atmosphere

Chakra of the Week: The Unstruck Anahata

 

 

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Anahata: The Unstruck

The Heart Chakra is the center for unconditional love, compassion, empathy, forgiveness and tolerance. The Heart is the seat of the Soul.

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Aromatherapy

Support heart chakra balance with the following:

yoga/physical exercises

  • Try swimming (breast stroke).
  • Do pushups.
  • Practice heart-opening techniques like hugging.
  • Suggested yoga poses: camel pose or eagle

Essences of fruit, leaf and flower combine to create a harmonious whole to produce balance at your heart chakra center.

Ingredients:

Directions:

Blend essential oils, then add to water in a spray mister bottle. Shake contents vigorously then mist self and airspace to encourage a soothed and accepting heart.

In my experience, vertiver soothes my heart center and always has. It is my personal recommendation to add vertiver to any heart chakra aromatherapy or essential oil blend or recipe.